Tuesday, November 02, 2010

NASA Troubleshoots Engine Trouble On Shuttle Discovery









NASA engineers are troubleshooting a problem with one of Discovery's main engine controllers and its unclear whether it might prompt a delay in the planned launch Wednesday of the orbiter's 39th and final flight.

Engineers detected voltage irregularities in the back up controller on Main Engine No. 3. Each of the shuttle's three liquid-fueled main engines have primary and back-up controllers that effectively are the electronic brains of the engines.

Engineers will brief managers today while launch preparations continue here at Kennedy Space Center. That meeting was originally scheduled for 3 p.m., but has now been pushed back to 5 p.m.

As it stands, liftoff remains scheduled for 3:52 p.m. Wednesday.

The same back-up controller exhibited some circuitry trouble during routine prelaunch checkouts earlier in the countdown, but switch throws in the shuttle's cockpit cycled power on and off, clearing the problem. NASA Test Conductor Steve Payne said that problem was considered to be resolved.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

lol

Anonymous said...

im

Anonymous said...

Postponed until Thursday now. Way to keep up, FT.

Anonymous said...

Looks like this shuttle mission could end up like the Challenger! BOOM!! Fireworks instead of Discovery's final successful mission.

Learn from your past NASA before it’s too late & then all you’ll say again is “I should have done more to prevent the tragedy”
REMEMBER: “I should have done more," the engineer told me, shaking his head. "I could have done more."
That engineer and several others were not surprised when Challenger exploded 73 seconds after liftoff on Jan. 28, 1986. They worked for Morton Thiokol (now ATK Thiokol), the Utah-based NASA contractor which produced the solid rocket motors that lifted space shuttles from their launch pads. Some of those Thiokol engineers expected o-ring failures at liftoff. They knew that cold overnight temperatures forecast before launch would stiffen the rubber o-rings. They knew that stiff o-rings didn't provide a secure seal. In fact, there had been evidence of leakage, what the engineers called "blowby," on an earlier shuttle flight”

Anonymous said...

With so many sub-contractors working on these shuttles over the years, it's a wonder that any of them were able to get off the ground. (cheap parts; low bid contracts, et al.) We should be glad when the space program is finally over. Look at all the billions wasted while half the country is wondering how to pay their mortgage, basic essentials, medical bills et. after losing their jobs.

Anonymous said...

For those of you who think it’s wrong to bash NASA & assume we don’t appreciate GPS, cell phones, TV, microwaves, etc. & all the cancer- biology- chemistry - physics research. Just think of all the electromagnetic radiation many of NASA ‘S discoveries have also created needing even more cancer-biology-chemistry research due to the health risks these devices cause. We can thank NASA for the invention of Space Sticks & Moon Tang. Way to go NASA for all the billions you wasted on risking our lives for your inequitable worthless glory. Or was it all for the money!

Anonymous said...

As if another days' delay wasn't to be expected. NASA should wait until Thanksgiving Day. Wouldn't surprise me one bit.