Friday, November 06, 2009

NASA Aims To Ramp Up Ares Test Flight Program

NASA is considering sweeping changes in its Ares I test flight program that would minimize a gap in U.S. human space exploration, preserve a critically skilled work force and accelerate development of a heavy-lift rocket for missions beyond Earth's orbit.

Three test flights of the Ares I rocket would be staged at Kennedy Space Center in 2012, 2013 and 2014, providing major milestones that could bolster political and public support for the embattled program. No money is set aside for flights in 2012 and 2013, so NASA is re-evaluating its budget to see how it can come up with the necessary funds.

Successful tests would prove that Ares rocket systems work. They also would significantly improve confidence that Ares I rockets and Orion spacecraft will be ready for piloted flights on schedule in March 2015.

See the full story HERE

ABOUT THE IMAGE: Click to enlarge the NASA image of the Ares I-X rocket blasting off from launch pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center on Oct. 28. You can also click the enlarged image to get an even bigger, more detailed view. The Ares I-X generated at liftoff generated more than 23 times the power output of the Hoover Dam, producing a maximum thrust of about 3.3 million pounds. The rocket reached a speed of 100 mph in eight seconds. Top velocity during flight: Just about Mach 5. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph and Kevin O'Connel

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Ares will cost at least $50 billion to build and operate, and every penny will be borrowed. What will it accomplish that can't be done less expensively by the Delta, Atlas, or Shuttle, which are already available, or by the Falcon, which will have lower costs and newer technology? What will Ares return to the taxpayers in commercial or military payloads or tourist tickets? During Apollo we had a budget surplus, but those days are gone. NASA must pay its way with practical benefits.

Anonymous said...

Norman Augustine made a great point. Last year Americans spent 7 billion betting on the Super Bowl, 32 billion on movies and videos, and 60 billion on illegal drugs. Funding for NASA is a matter of national priorities. NASA is helping to create a new space launch industry, stimulate the economy, provide jobs, create new technologies, and new scientific discoveries.

"Our space program challenges young minds, and causes us to dream big and achieve beyond our expectations." (Rep. P Griffith)

Graham said...

I totally agree with that last comment. 99 billion dollars!. Nasa could do such a massive amount with that kind of fund.

MajorB said...

Ares rockets just named Invention of the Year by Time Magazine. I think they will be funded now! Go Ares!

Graham said...

Nice one Time .!!!.

Graham said...

I would like to add i've just read times article,and it's a great one they've done it again .

Canada Guy said...

The future of human space exploration looks bleak. After making great leaps 50 years ago, stagnation has taken over. No human has left Earth orbit in 37 years, and NASA's current unambitious goals look to be further delayed or scaled back.

http://www.watchinghistory.com/2009/11/future-of-space-exploration.html

Graham said...

On the contrary their goals are very ambitious,if you go and look at their plans for the future. But it's the lack of will and vision and ultimately funding in other quarters thats holding NASA back.

Constellation Programme will do massive things if it's got behind fully and totally. The engineers and astronauts have the dreams and the will. I agree it's far far too long to be stuck in LOW EARTH ORBIT .